Archer
The Archery Library
Old Archery Books, Articles and Prints
home - about - books - articles - prints faq - news - contact - search
   
Home > Books > Mason > North American Bows, Arrows and Quivers > Plate XLVI
Plate XLVI
Siouan Arrows, Dakota Tribes

FIG. 1. SHAFT, of osier. Shaftment, banded with red. Feathers, three, seized with. sinew at the end and shorn neatly on the outer edges. Near the nock of the arrow is an ornamental feather in the feathering, produced by leaving the plume on both sides of the rib of the feather for about an inch, so that the arrow at this point appears to have six feathers. The nock is slightly spreading; notch, U-shaped. No head. Total length of shaft, 27| inches.

Cat. No. 21286, U. S. N. M. Sioux Indians, Minnesota. Collected by Rev. Geo. Ainslie.

FIG. 2. On this arrow a pyramidal piece of bone serves for a head, and the shaftment is striped with blue and red. This specimen is figured for the purpose of showing oddities of form since the adoption of the rifle. Neither of these arrows, probably, was ever used. Among the Plains Indians the iron arrowhead was introduced many years ago, and samples with stone heads are extremely rare and quite open to suspicion. Length, 24 inches.

Cat. No. 8439, U. S. N. M. Sioux Indians, Fort Berthold. Collected by Drs. Gray and Matthews, U. S. Army.

FIG. 3. SHAFT, a rod of osier; blood streaks, very jagged. Feathers, three, seized with sinew, loosely wrapped, glued to the shaftment, and there are streaks of blue paint drawn between the featherings. The nock is bulbous; the notch is widely angular. Head, of chalcedony, notched on the sides and glued into a notch in the end of the shaft. The seizing is gone from this arrow, but the notches in the side of the head, as well as the clean appearance of the shaft, indicate that it was once present.

FIG. 4. SHAFTMENT, a delicate rod of osier; blood streaks, wavy. Shaftment tapering' toward the nock. Feathers, three, seized at the end with sinew and standing off from the shaftment. Nock, slightly expanding; notch, swallow tail-shaped. Head, a piece of wire driven into the end of the shaft, very neatly seized with sinew, and sharpened at the point. Length, 26 inches. Cat. No. 2466, U. S. N. M. Sioux Indians. Collected by Dr. Washington Matthews, U. S. Array.

FIG. 5. SHAFT, of osier. Shaftment, banded with red. Feathers, three, seized at each end with sinew and glued. The nock is swallowtail-shaped; notch, angular. In the arrows of the Sioux the nock is usually very much widened out at the extremity, giving the warrior a firm grip in releasing. Head, of obsidian, rudely chipped and inserted into the notch in the end of the shaft. In the companion to this arrow the blood streaks are slightly jagged. The head is of white jasper and the feather is 10 1/2 inches long. Length, 24 inches. Length of feathers, 10 inches.

Cat. No. 8439, U. S. N. M. Sioux Indians. Collected by Gray and Matthews, U. S. Army.

Plate XLVI
Copyright © 1998 - 2017 | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy