Archer
The Archery Library
Old Archery Books, Articles and Prints
home - about - books - articles - prints faq - news - contact - search
   
Home > Books > Arab Archery > XI. On bracing, which is the same as stringing
XI. On bracing, which is the same as stringing
Part 3 of 5

The fourth method of bracing is called the bracing of the frightened and fleeing archer and is among the most interesting ways of stringing a bow. If you happen to be facing an assault by sword or spear or the like, run away from your assailant placing your left hand on the grip and the palm of your right hand on the neck of the upper limb while the lower siyah is directly in front of you and the upper siyah inclined toward you. Then strike the lower siyah against the ground, drawing at the same time the grip toward you with your left hand and pressing with the palm of your right hand against the neck of the upper limb to the fore away from you. With the index finger and the thumb of your right hand straighten out the eye and push it into the nock. All this you do while on the run. You must be sure, however, that you strike the ground with the lower siyah with great care, lest you break the bow. Consequently you should not attempt this method of bracing unless you are already adept at it or have been compelled to resort to it. If you so desire, you may also grasp the bow with your left hand with its belly toward you and your right hand on the neck of the upper limb while its lower siyah lies between your feet. Then push the grip to the fore away from you with your left hand and draw the neck of the upper limb toward you with the right, allowing your hand to slide up the neck while the index finger and the thumb straighten out the eye and push it into the nock. The firs of these two methods is quicker to perform while the sec and is safer for the bow.

The fifth method of bracing is called "the bracing of the wounded." It is suitable for the use of an archer who has received an injury in one of his hands, and it is among the interesting methods of bracing. It consists of inserting your foot between the string and the bow so that the string lies between your legs and the bow parallels your thigh from without. You then place its lower siyah in the fold of your thigh and leg and rest it against the latter, while the upper limb parallels your thigh from without. With the palm of your hand on the neck of its upper limb, you then press against the bow and allow your index finger and your thumb to straighten the eye and push it into the nock It is indeed more appropriate to call this method "concealed bracing," because it is accomplished with one hand on one side, and is more concealed than the other. It was called "the bracing of the wounded" because an archer with a disabled arm is compelled to resort to it.

Concerning the manner in which an archer who has injured one of his arms can shoot, the following has beer mentioned: The archer places the grip of the bow between the hollow of one foot and the instep of the other, lies down on his back, nocks the arrow with his uninjured hand, draws, and releases. Some archers maintain that this method of shooting is worthless; yet, in certain instances, the archer is driven to its use, particularly if one of hi: hands has been injured. Of course, practice in the use of this method is very helpful. Through it a degree of accuracy may be obtained. The archer should lie down on his back, raise his head and shoulders, as well as part of his back, so that the uninjured hand is raised from the ground, thereby insuring freedom of movement and avoiding hitting the ground when releasing. Furthermore, by raising his head, shoulders, and part of his back, the archer obtains a better view of his object and, therefore, a better aim.

Copyright © 1998 - 2017 | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy